The brave new world of tomorrow's tablets


Photo that ran with the story below yesterday.


Screenshot from device featured in MindScans. Pretty cool, huh?

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/48189278/ns/technology_and_science-tech_and_gadgets/?ocid=twitter

Posted on 16 Apr 2014, 13:14 - Category: MindScans
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Scientists set to show how they hacked into Stephen Hawking's brain



After months of tweaking, researchers are finally ready to show off a high-tech headband that can translate Stephen Hawking's brain waves into speech — providing what could eventually become an easier avenue for the paralyzed British physicist and many others to share their deep thoughts.

The system, developed by San Diego-based NeuroVigil and known as iBrain, uses a head-mounted receiver the size of a matchbox to pick up different types of brain waves. iBrain employs a computer algorithm called SPEARS to analyze the brain emanations and encode them for a text-based speech reader...

http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/06/25/12401493-scientists-set-to-show-how-they-hacked-into-stephen-hawkings-brain?lite

Posted on 26 Jun 2012, 20:15 - Category: MindScans
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Hello, Robotic Overlords: Intel's Making Tech That Learns And Adapts To Your Habits



When web surfers aren't busy calling each other Nazis on forums, they're often cracking jokes about greeting their future robotic overlords with open arms. It won't be funny forever; the groundwork for our eventual demise is already being laid by the best minds in the land. IBM announced that it had created prototype cognitive chips modeled after the human brain almost a year ago, and today, Reuters reported that Intel is launching a research project in Israel dedicated to creating smart tech that can learn the habits of its users. (That way, SkyNet will know the best time to strike.)...

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/news/hello_robotic_overlords_intels_making_tech_learns_and_adapts_your_habits

Posted on 28 May 2012, 13:56 - Category: MindScans
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Will avatars keep soldiers fighting fit?



Video game training helps Army simulate real-life battlefield

For Col. Anthony Krogh, the approaching end of more than 10 years of war seems more like a call to action.

The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have taken a toll, but they have also left the US Army battle-tested. As peacetime draws nearer, the Pentagon is grappling with a vital question: How can the military keep its soldiers engaged and fighting fit, both physically and mentally?

Krogh thinks he knows one answer: video games. Short of building fake villages "with goats wandering and smells and all that," video-game training is the only way consistently to put soldiers in environments like the ones they have operated in since 2001, says Krogh, head of the Army's national simulation command.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47282862/ns/us_news-christian_science_monitor/#.T6__gevltV4

Posted on 13 May 2012, 10:36 - Category: MindScans
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So you're a cyborg -- now what?



Quick: What's the fattiest system in your body that has two halves and weighs between 2 and 4 pounds?

It's your brain -- you know, that thing that remembers stuff. But because of rapidly evolving information technology, your first impulse was probably to search for the answer on the Internet.
As we become ever more dependent on external sources of memory -- using GPS to guide our driving, smartphones to keep our schedules -- it's time to rethink our ideas about what "memory" actually is.

While we don't physically plug smartphones and other devices into our heads, in some ways we're already one with them, as evidenced by the anxiety we feel when we're without them. Would you remember to pick up milk? Would you know your parents' phone numbers?

If you've ever found yourself running late because you left your phone at home, "you might be a cyborg," says Fred Trotter, a blogger who spoke about information technology at the Health Journalism 2012 conference in April.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/05/07/health/memory-computers-brain/index.html?htp=hp_c2

Posted on 13 May 2012, 10:34 - Category: MindScans
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iBrain can ‘read your mind’; enlists Stephen Hawking



A team of California scientists have developed the world's first portable brain scanner, and it may soon be able to "read a person's mind," playing a major role in facilitating medical breakthroughs.

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/ibrain-read-mind-enlists-stephen-hawking-223110217.html

Posted on 10 Apr 2012, 18:50 - Category: MindScans
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Bike lets you change gears with your mind



In 2011, Toyota commissioned the high-tech marketing firm Deeplocal to create an unusual Prius campaign. The firm came up with a mind-controlled bike...

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46694425/ns/technology_and_science-innovation/t/bike-lets-you-change-gears-your-mind-if-you-concentrate/#.T1436TGPVfY

Posted on 12 Mar 2012, 9:53 - Category: MindScans
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Super-human brain technology sparks ethics debate



A British ethics group has launched a debate on the ethical dilemmas posed by new technologies that tap into the brain and could bring super-human strength, highly enhanced concentration or thought-controlled weaponry...

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/01/us-brain-neurotechnology-ethics-idUSTRE82000F20120301

Posted on 2 Mar 2012, 12:47 - Category: MindScans
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Mind Reading a Reality in Five Years, IBM Says



Within five years, IBM believes we'll begin to see early applications of mind reading technology that up to now have been little more than science fiction fantasies. The geeks in blue are, at this very moment, researching ways to link your brain to electronic devices so, for example, you could simply think about calling someone on your smartphone and it would happen. And looking longer term, IBM believes brain control will take over manual typing...

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/news/mind_reading_reality_five_years_ibm_says

Posted on 7 Feb 2012, 14:23 - Category: MindScans
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Do we want brain scanners to read our minds?



As 'vegetative' patients ‘talk’ to scientists, Professor Colin Blakemore assesses the profound implications this has for the sick - and the healthy

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/7159464/Do-we-want-brain-scanners-to-read-our-minds.html

Posted on 6 Feb 2010, 18:14 - Category: MindScans
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